09/08/2022

Pet Care

Care They Need, Love They Deserve

14 South Africa Pet Owner Statistics to Know in 2022 | Pet Keen


Note: This article’s statistics come from third-party sources and do not represent the opinions of this website.

The pet industry in South Africa has always been a well-developed market., With the opportunity to own large properties with plenty of garden space, beautiful weather all year round, and an outdoor lifestyle, most South Africans are happy pet owners. Since the pandemic hit and restrictions kept people in their homes, adoptions became more popular for security and companionship.

Here are 14 South African Pet Owner Statistics to Know in 2022.

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Top 14 South Africa Pet Owner Statistics to Know in 2022

  1. Unexpected surgeries can cost up to R25 000 ($1,546.71.)
  2. Owners of a new pet spend an average of R30 000–R60 000 ($1,856.05 – $3,712.10) in vet fees in the first year.
  3. Only 1% of cats and dogs are insured in South Africa.
  4. 7% of residential tenants prefer a pet-friendly property in South Africa.
  5. Global indicators suggest that most pet South African owners are millennials under the age of 40.
  6. At least 60% of South African households own at least one pet.
  7. 49% of pets spend the night indoors.
  8. Dogs are the top pets in South Africa with large dogs accounting for 50% of the dog population.
  9. More than 90% of dogs in South Africa are either nonvaccinated or inappropriately vaccinated.
  10. Abandoned animals’ cost R37,5 million ($2,320,060.01) a year in South Africa.
  11. Feral tomcats have a lifespan of approximately 3 years.
  12. The South African council determines the number of dogs kept on any premises.
  13. Thousands of South Africans keep a variety of snake species in their homes.
  14. Owning a tiger in South Africa is legal.

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Cost of Owning a Pet Statistics in South Africa

1. Unexpected surgeries can cost up to R25 000 ($1,546.71.)

(Pet Health Care)

With the high costs of operating a veterinary practice, from medical products to business expenditures, and training, vet fees can be costly to account for these expenses. Unexpected surgeries can cost up to R25 000 ($1,546.71).


2. Owners of a new pet spend an average of R30 000–R60 000 ($1,856.05 – $3,712.10) in vet fees in the first year.

(Pet Health Care)

Buying or adopting a new pet can end up being a costly experience. Deworming and sterilization, vaccinations, flea and tick control, neutering, consultation, and adoption fees are some of the fees that are included in getting a new pet.

manx cat lying on the floor
Image Credit: Seattle Cat Photo, Shutterstock

3. Only 1% of cats and dogs are insured in South Africa.

(Pet Health Care)

Not all pet owners are in a financial position to cover unexpected veterinary bills upfront. Veterinary bills can be expensive, and in many cases, pet owners must put their pets to sleep because they simply don’t have the finances to pay for veterinary bills. Despite this, only 1% of cats and dogs are insured.

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Pet Care Preference Statistics in South Africa

4. 7% of residential tenants prefer a pet-friendly property in South Africa.

(House and Garden)

There is a growing number of animal lovers who consider their pets needs when deciding where to live. Potential homeowners are willing to spend more on a property that is large enough for their their pet. Although it’s possible to negotiate with a landlord about having a dog or cat, rental properties are usually not pet-friendly.


5. Global indicators suggest that most pet South African owners are millennials under the age of 40.

(House and Garden)

Millennials are choosing “pet children” for financial or lifestyle reasons, and their pets are part of the family.

caspian horse
Image Credit: KUSHEI, Shutterstock

6. At least 60% of South African households own at least one pet.

(House and Garden)

At least 60% of South African households own at least one pet, and most people are under the age of 40. Pets have also become popular for the elderly and singles seeking companionship.


7. 49% of pets spend the night indoors.

(Media Mark)

A lot of South Africans consider their pets a part of the family. A survey revealed that 49% of pet owners’ furry friends spend the night indoors, and for some, that means sharing a bed too.


8. Dogs are the top pets in South Africa with large dogs accounting for 50% of the dog population.

(Research and Market)

Dogs are a popular pet amongst South Africans due to safety concerns and security.

mountain dog running with tongue out
Image Credit: Pixabay, Pexels

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Pet Health Statistics in South Africa

9. More than 90% of dogs in South Africa are either nonvaccinated or inappropriately vaccinated.

(Vet Directory)

It is currently estimated that more than 90% of dogs in South Africa are considered either non-vaccinated or inappropriately vaccinated. This leaves less than 10% of animals with some level of protection against disease.


10. Abandoned animals’ cost R37,5 million ($2,320,060.01) a year in South Africa.

(IOL)

At least 500,000 domestic animals are put down annually, costing an estimated R37,5 million a year. The pandemic created a lot of financial strain, and several pet owners had to let their pets go.

Bulldog after a swim
Image Credit: danielsfotowelt, Pixabay

11. Feral tomcats have a lifespan of approximately 3 years.

(Vet Directory)

Indoor cats, especially those that have been spayed or neutered, will usually live longer than tomcats.. While wild tomcats have a life span of around 3 years, a neutered house cat that is healthy can live happily into his late teens.

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General Pet Statistics for South Africa

12. The South African council determines the number of dogs kept on any premises.

(Open by Laws)

No more than two dogs can be kept in a small flat, no more than four dogs are allowed in a house, and more than six dogs have to be kept on an agricultural property.


13. Thousands of South Africans keep a variety of snake species in their homes.

(news24)

Keeping snakes as a pet is a popular hobby for South Africans, and these can range from harmless to venomous. Most provinces, except Kwazulu Natal, require permits to keep local snakes.

a bird on the edge of a bird bath
Image Credit: Lindell325, Pixabay

14. Owning a tiger in South Africa is legal.

(The Citizen)

Legal loopholes have made it surprisingly easy to own a tiger in Gauteng, South Africa. Current by-laws for wild animals do not prohibit keeping a wild animal as a pet, but although by-laws are scant, there are still requirements to owning an exotic animal, especially one as large as a tiger.

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Frequently Asked Questions About Pet Ownership Statistics in South Africa

How Many Dogs and Cats Are Owned in South Africa?

Data from the market research firm Euromonitor indicates South Africa is a definite dog country, with South Africans owning 9.1 million dogs compared to 2.4 million cats. (IOL)

What Do South African Pet Owners Spend the Most Money on?

The industry boom over the last two years was primarily driven by pet snacks, treats, and healthcare. Dog food is the largest category in the pet care market. (Business Insider)

bengal-cat-sitting
Image Credit: TheCats, Shutterstock

How Many Pets Are You Allowed in South Africa?

 The Animal Protection Act of 1962 restricts the number of animals allowed on a property according to the type of property that is owned. For dogs over 6 months old, a maximum of two dogs are allowed in a dwelling unit, three dogs are allowed in a freestanding property, four dogs are allowed in a property on a plot exceeding 600m2, and six dogs are allowed on an agricultural property.

You cannot have more than four cats can on a residential property and no more than six on an agricultural property. (Remax)

What Is The Main Reason That South Africans Own Pets?

 At least 60% of South African households own at least one pet. Pets are popular companions among the elderly and singles, and the younger generation is choosing to care for pets instead of children due to lifestyle or financial reasons. Since the pandemic, adoptions have increased as more citizens seek companionship. (IOL)

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Conclusion

The pet ownership trend continues to grow in South Africa, and South Africans all over the country are adopting pets, not only for companionship but as an extra security measure, especially on farming land where the residents are more vulnerable.

Some drawbacks have also had effects on pet owners, with the pandemic negatively affecting financial status and forcing some pet owners to give up their pets. However, the market is steadily recovering, and most South Africans consider their pets a part of the family


Featured Image Credit: icemanphotos, Shutterstock

Quoted from Various Sources

Published for: WATPFC